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Did you guys know that this is a thing?

28 Apr

I have not been doing the “AAC” thing long, and I don’t deal with tech-AAC frequently. I make a lot of communication books, gesture dictionaries, and just general working with families on implementing strategies to increase communicative attempts in the natural environment. I have recommended an actual communication device only 3 times so the funding piece of things tends to be a bit over my head. Most companies have someone that will work with you on getting devices to trial, completing the appropriate paperwork, and procuring the device and I worship the ground said person walks on.

I recently recommended a device for a client, contacted the company to find out about funding and was told that they don’t do it. AACK. WHAT? Mind blown. I just assumed that every speech generating device for every client would be funded in some capacity, one way or another (I also live in magical fairy AAC land, did I not mention that?)  But the device doesn’t qualify as “durable medical equipment” so the company doesn’t bill insurance.

So now what? The company told me to contact a durable medical equipment company in my area and have them “give them a call.” ABOUT WHAT? GIVE YOU A CALL? I swear some days I feel like I’m losing my mind with these hoops.

Luckily I have my very own AT guru (you may all express your jealousy) who explained that the client’s primary insurance company likely has a DME company they work with for AAC. So the trick is to contact that specific DME company, and work with THEM on funding the device. It’s just more red tape than usual but seriously who knew? In case you didn’t know – now you do!

Learn something new every day I suppose.

(On the AAC-upside, I’m working with a client right now who is actually having success and demonstrating progress with the Tobii I-15 eye-gaze system and I couldn’t be more thrilled. I’ve only ever seen typical adults use eye-gaze systems so it’s a beautiful thing to watch it happen before your very eyes with someone who has disabilities.)

NP: Dime Porque (One of my client’s parents was listening to this during a home visit today and I was like, “This is quite catchy even though I do not understand.)