Archive | #slpeeps RSS feed for this section

tricks of the trade

16 Sep

I just had my 2 year workiversary! (At the end of July.) As such I thought I’d celebrate two months late by sharing some of my early intervention tips!

1. Put it on your head. I don’t know why, but kids think hats are hilarious. Whenever a kid is not looking at me, is about to cry, is crying, is about to bail on a toy, is distracted – whatever – I just put something on my head. 60% of the time this works every time.

2. Bubbles freeze in the winter and crayons melt in the summer. Plan accordingly.

3. Also on bubbles: blow UP not out. When you blow up, you have time to draw attention to the bubbles, talk about the bubbles, sing about the bubbles, and generally enjoy the bubbles. When you blow out they just fall down and suck.

4. Get yourself pants with a strong knee. I’ve gone through three pairs of pants in less than two years. Double duty knees. Support knees. Worker knees.  Utility knees. Or maybe buy one of those gardening squishy rectangles.

5. In addition, get yourself a poker face. You can’t buy this but I highly recommend obtaining one. Poker face has been something I’ve been working on for years, but now that I’ve sort of got my face under control I find my life is a lot easier. When a kid does something that grosses me out, annoys me, makes me mad, makes me laugh (when I shouldn’t), makes me sad, or shocks me – you would never know. I’m like Mona Lisa MS, CCC-SLP over here. You don’t want parents or children feeding into your emotions during therapy sessions so lock it up!

6. Patience is a virtue.  Learn to wait. I always tell the kids, “I know, waiting is so hard!” and I make them wait for everything…but it took me a long time to learn to wait for them. Waiting waiting waiting. I do it all day. Wait for them to reach, wait for them to vocalize, wait for them to calm down, wait for them to notice. Quit anticipating, quit assuming, quit rushing, quit pushing. COOL YOUR JETS.

7.  Embrace the germs. I mean, Clorox wipe everything and wear gloves when needed. Embrace that you are going to get sick a lot when you first start. Like, a LOT. Way more than you can possibly anticipate. Start stocking up now on all your favorite cold and cough meds, you’re gonna need them. I’m here to tell you that there is a light at the end of the tunnel…after two years I have the immune system of a feral mutt. I can withstand anything (A kid sneezed into my open mouth the other day and I lived to tell the tale.) And you will too. But you have to live through the first six months.

8. Get a mentor (or three). I have a lot of mentors. I have my mentor for picture exchange, I have my mentor for feeding, I have my mentor for behavior, I have my mentor for apraxia…the list goes on. I don’t harangue these people endlessly for lunch dates so we can discuss me and my progress in becoming a grown SLP like them. But I do say, “Hey can I pick your brain about this little guy?” when I need back up. Know when you need backup, and find strong resources. It’s okay to ask for help, and it’s okay to have lots of mentors. (I recommend reading Lean In’s chapter “Are You My Mentor?” if you’re looking to develop mentor-mentee relationships…it’s really very enlightening.)

9. Learn about the other disciplines as much as you can. In early intervention it is SO important to look at the whole child. And until you work with OT/PT/ECE regularly you’re going to have a harder time looking at the whole child (because what are you looking for!?) You’ll see so much improvement when you make adjustments based on those other disciplines. You’ll know when to make referrals, and when to just make a suggestion. It’s hard to help the whole child make major improvements when you’re just looking at his mouth. Cotreat. Observe. Ask. 

10. Be flexible. No two kids are alike. Seriously. None. What worked with one, will work again with none. It’s insane. You will see new things every single day. I always say, “Never a dull moment” with EI. It will keep you on your toes and keep you moving and thinking constantly.  As an early interventionist you’ve got to be open to new ideas – whatever you’ve got planned probably isn’t going to go as you imagined 🙂

 

If you’re just starting out in EI I hope some of these help you on your path. If you’re a seasoned EI Vet – share some of your tips and tricks, I’m always looking for new ideas!

NP: Ingrid Michaelson – Home

Measuring vocabulary development in bilingual children

10 Feb

The topic of my first Research Tuesday Blog is (drumroll please): “Total and Conceptual Vocabulary in Spanish–English Bilinguals From 22 to 30 Months: Implications for Assessment.”

This is all there is to see folks

This is all there is to see, folks

To understand the purpose and findings of this article it is beneficial to know the difference between total and conceptual vocabulary.

Total vocabulary is the sum of the words a child knows across two languages.

Conceptual vocabulary gives the child credit for knowing concepts rather than words, and concepts that are represented in both languages are counted only once.

So basically, when looking at a bilingual child’s total vocabulary you would count both the word perro and the word dog. If you were looking at conceptual vocabulary you would only give the child credit for knowing one concept: the furry, four-legged creature in my house which barks and eats kibble is a dog/perro.

The bottom line about this article? The researchers found that when assessing bilingual children, it is most appropriate and beneficial to look at total vocabulary (total vocab FTW!) A clinician is able to look at total vocabulary in a bilingual child by providing the MacArthur Bates Communicative Development Inventory (CDI; Fenson et al.,1993) in English as well as in the family’s home language.

What happened in this research project? Cynthia Core, Erika Hoff, Rosario Rumiche, and Melissa Señor provided families of 47 bilingual families with the CDI and the Inventario del Desarrollo de Habilidades Comunicativas (IDHC; Jackson-Maldonado et al., 2003.) This was a longitudinal study; the children were assessed at 22, 25, and 30 months-of-age.  The children were age and socioeconomically matched with 56 monolingual (English-speaking) children who were assessed with only the CDI.

At the initial 22 month trial, all parents completed the Ages and Stages Questionaire (Squires et al., 1999). The parents of monolingual children completed the CDI, and the parents of bilingual children completed both the CDI and IDHC, at the 22, 25, and 30 month session. The CDI and IDHC provide parents with a checklist of words they have heard their child produce and yields raw vocabulary scores based on this checklist. Both tests provide a percentile based on monolingual norms.

Then the researchers ran all sorts of crazy ANOVAs and t-tests and z-ratios which were totally over my head so I skipped ahead to the conclusion.

Researchers found:

The Spanish-English bilingual children showed a mean conceptual vocabulary which was significantly lower than their total vocabulary.

Total vocabulary in the bilingual children was not different from the monolingual children at any of the three sessions.

Conceptual vocabulary in the bilingWual children was considerably lower than the monolingual children at the 30 month visit.

Total vocabulary assessment did not identify any more/less at-risk bilingual children than bilingual children. Conceptual vocabulary assessment identified a higher number of bilingual children who appeared to have vocab development in the low-average range.

When one compares a bilingual child’s vocabulary to monolingual norms it underestimates the child’s expressive language and over-identifies at-risk children.

Using the CDI (and the home-language counterpart) clinicians can get a clear picture of a bilingual child’s total vocabulary without being responsible for considering the child’s language experiences, and language dominance, and language overlap, and the “balance” in their bilingualism. Clinicians are able to see clear change using these protocols (which we all love).

The authors caution us to remember to take socioeconomic status and receptive language into account. They also suggest that monolingual testing may be appropriate in the event that a clinician wants to know about English proficiency (or the proficiency of the home language.) They also pointed out that similar studies have been done previously with mixed results. ALSO the researchers did a really nice literature review to give you more background on bilingualism, total and conceptual vocab etc., so please read that if you desire.

Direct Link (you will need your ASHA login): http://jslhr.pubs.asha.org/article.aspx?articleid=1797298&resultClick=1

Citations:

Cynthia Core, Erika Hoff, Rosario Rumiche, Melissa Señor; Total and Conceptual Vocabulary in Spanish–English Bilinguals From 22 to 30 Months: Implications for Assessment. J Speech Lang Hear Res 2013;56(5):1637-1649. doi: 10.1044/1092-4388(2013/11-0044).

Fenson, L., Dale, P. S., Reznick, J. S., Thal, D., Bates, E., Hartung, J. P., … Reilly, J. S. (1993). The MacArthur Communicative Development Inventories: User’s guide and technical manual. San Diego, CA: Singular.

Jackson-Maldonado, D., Thal, D. J., Fenson, L., Marchman, V., Newton, T., Conboy, B. (2003). El Inventario del Desarrollo de Habilidades Comunicativas: User’s guide and technical manual. Baltimore, MD: Brookes.

Squires, J., Potter, L., Bricker, D. (1999). Ages and Stages Questionnaire: Parent-Completed Child Monitoring System (2nd ed.). Baltimore, MD: Brookes.

Clinical self-discovery. It’s okay!

21 Jan

Hey 2014, great to see ya!

It’s been two (TWO!) years since I started my internships and I’ve been thinking quite a bit on the narrowing of my clinical interests.

When I started my internships, I had no idea what I liked and didn’t like. I mean, I THOUGHT I knew (but we all know that’s silly…you have no clue until you get experience under that very cute belt you’re wearing.) I THOUGHT I wanted adult and hospitals. I THOUGHT I hated AAC (now we have a love-hate relationship.) I THOUGHT I wanted middle school students with diagnoses of ED/BD.

Hahaha. Thoughts.

I knew after my first internship that I loved working with the little children – you know, the weensy ones with the munchkin voices. I knew after my second internship that I did not want to focus on ED/BD. I knew after my third internship that hospitals are not my scene. Even after that, we still have quite an elaborate scope of practice to choose from.

So I got my first job and started my CF with a great, big, wide open caseload. Early intervention, bilingual early intervention, adult dysphagia, adult AAC and cognitive communicative therapy, peds feeding. Behavior, family coaching, communication strategies, group homes, ASL. Lions, tigers, and bears, OH MY!

When I started I was all, “Ohmygod I loooove it allllllll.” Now, a year and a half in, I’m seeing that I have clientele that I get excited about and things I look forward to and enjoy learning about. In turn, there are clinical things I don’t get super thrilled to death about. (Don’t get me wrong. I love all of my patients, but as far as clinical interests go there are things that I just professionally am more intrigued by.) (Was that a fragmented sentence?)(Sorry.) Since I would like to pursue the Ph.D. at some point, figuring out those clinical interests is a really important thing! I can’t stroll into a Ph.D. program and say, “Hey ya’ll – I like everything!” I need to find out what I love so that I won’t mind studying it for the rest of the foreseeable future.

So what do I enjoy? I love working with my Latino babies and families for language therapy. I love working with adults with developmental disabilities. I love adult dysphagia. I just wanna do those things all day.  Is there some communicative disorder where all three happen at once? Oh and I weirdly enjoy evaluations. Can’t really explain that one.

What do I sorta enjoy-ish? AAC. But not high-tech. I enjoy helping families use no-tech, low-tech strategies for targeting critical communication acts. (High-tech AAC makes me want to crawl in a hole. My brain rejects it. And the process for obtaining any device is the worst thing that ever happened. And it is just getting harder. And it is terrible. Run away!)

What am I unsure about? Peds feeding. It makes me so nervous. I don’t have a lot of practical experience and my book-knowledge is useless because it’s book-knowledge. Observation is an option, but frankly every child is so different there isn’t a ton I can take away from watching someone else do it. I’m learning as I go. Progress is slow (for me, not the kids.)

What am I pretty certain I don’t find particularly intriguing? High tech AAC! Adult acquired communicative-cognitive deficits pooooooooost-onset. School aged ANYTHING.

Part of me feels bad, about not loving it all. I have to remember that we ALL have clinical interests. That’s how we grow and develop specified skill sets. I can’t, mentally, love it all and I can’t know it all. I do truly enjoy interacting with and getting to know all of my clients. However, when faced with a puzzle, some situations get me all excited and riled up and I want to learn more. And I’m finding out what those exciting things are! Woo woo! Self-discovery!

And for your viewing pleasure, here is a picture of Simon snuggling with his own tail:

He is sooooo cute

He is sooooo cute

further details regarding my BAG

11 Nov

I was having mall and lunch time with MsSohanSLP on Sunday and she asked when the last time I blogged was.

Shame. I AM ASHAMED. It’s been a stupid long time. I have a wide variety of things I could blog about, and I choose not to because I’m a lazy, lazy SLP.

I thought the easiest way to return to the blogging was to segue from the previous post!

(lazy. i’m so lazy.)

As we know, I do home health with 0-3 about half my work week. As we also know, I have raging ADHD and can’t play with the same toys week after week after week like some kind of therapy zombie. So I *try* to change what I bring to homes each week. It can be a challenge and it requires some creativity, but it can be done, and if you’re a home therapist I encourage you to change it up when you can!

Anyway, since this “school” year started in September, I have been attempting to do THEMES! Yes, my bag is now themed! We do group therapy in my center and we do monthly themes so I thought, why not translate themes to home therapy as well?

So far I’ve done: farm animals, zoo animals, transportation, body parts, food, shapes/colors, letters/numbers, actions, and this week is SENSORY.

Since it’s sensory week I’ve got playdough, paint, shaving cream, crazy textured balls, a small bean box, touch and feel books, and so on and so forth. Also I have wipes and a table cloth because…I’m not dumb.

I’m kind of running out of ideas. I’ll probably do “home” as a theme, and “school” as a theme. Any suggestions are welcome! What are some concepts that you think 0-3 year olds should have under their belt by preschool?

Okay, that’s all for now. I’m going to be better, I swear! Well, I don’t swear but I’m making a sort of promise to be a better blogger. And give me theme ideas please and thank you!

 

NP: Lady Antebellum – Get to Me (this song gets me right in the feels).

Learning about Deaf culture

10 Mar

I owe Liza a post!

To start at the beginning, I took “sign language” as an undergrad. It was pretty much a VERY BASIC sign course where we talked a little about grammar and Deaf culture and learned a lot of nouns. I never used it functionally and lost most of it pretty quickly. As of July I had retained toddler signs, and that was about it.  I’m currently enrolled in a legit ASL course taught by a Deaf woman and it’s bad ass. But still, I’m learning a lot and by no means think that I can “sign.”

Anyway, things got interesting as my caseload expanded and I started seeing adults for AAC. A majority of my adults have developmental disabilities and three of them are Deaf. They had sign language interpreters attend evaluations as well as therapy
Continue reading

Checking in so you guys don’t think I died

15 Oct

YO.

Okay so listen, I still don’t have a computer (or internet) in my home and sometimes I just don’t want to blog from my tiny QWERTY phon keyboard. But that doesn’t mean I don’t have things to share!

1) A mom said I wasn’t kid friendly. But to be fair we ALL know that I have NO poker face whatsoever. I’ve been told this again and again and I just cannot get my face under control. Anyone who has seen my pictures on Facebook knows that my face does exactly what it wants. And I’m an open book anyway so that really doesn’t help. Talk about your heart on your sleeve – more like my heart is on my face.

2) A mom told me I was really connecting with her kid! See – people have good things to say too.

3) One of my adult patients was really into hair. And hugging. And patting my arms.

4) I’ve been doing so MANY swallow evals and I’d love to tell you about them in another post I’m just giving you a quick and dirty run down so hold your horses!

5) I did an AAC eval and I’m starting AAC device trialing this week – see number four for elaboration.

6) I’m trying to talk @kimabts into being a wug for Halloween.

uh. This is a wug.

7. It’s almost my three month anniversary at my job and as such I’m almost done with segment 1 of my CF! Holy guacamole!

8. I got strep for the first time! Yay early intervention! Also all of the children have rashes. Delightful.

9. I always thought I was really good at singing songs about my life activities but now that I’m in EI I can sing anything! WITH a tune. SOMETIMES in SPANISH.

10. My desk collapsed at work and someone came and put a traffic cone next to it. If they were smart they’d just make me wear a traffic cone around my neck at all times.

Yeah. Cone of Shame. Also I was almost crushed by speech therapy materials.

Also if anyone knows of a “communication board” to use with adults in the hospital setting tweet at @kimabts and let her know. I don’t really know any more details than that so don’t ask me ask her!

Okay now I’ll write about visual swallow studies and AAC. And maybe CFs. We’ll see. I only have an hour on this computer in the library.

NP: You Da One – Rihanna

SCENARIO

30 Sep

My friend and fellow CF texted me earlier with this clinical dilemma and I bet it’s something a lot of us are dealing with. And it takes the heat off me and MY biggest struggle.

SCENARIO!
Place: School setting
Delivery: Autism group therapy
Grades: Anything K-8
# in Group: Three to Four
Severity: The whole spectrum. Nonverbal. Low cognition. High functioning. All over the place.
Goals: Expressive Language. Receptive Language. Pragmatic. The gamut.
Current status: Kids who are verbal are more focused on pragmatic USE of language. Kids who are non verbal have access to picture exchange or verbal output devices but have received no training.
Frequency: One hour a week

The breakdown:
UH what the heck do I do? Overwhelming much? None of these kids are on the same page. I have one hour with them. How do I maximize my time? How do I make sure they’re all benefiting? My caseload is nutty bananas – I can’t give them individual services even though some of these kids need them and that’s all I want to do.

Ideas:
Ok. So say two kids are verbal and their goals are more pragmatic. And two are nonverbal and their goals are more expressive. Here’s what you need: a craft. Or snack time/cooking. But more appropriately a craft. A craft that for all parties is going to require asking for school tools, commenting, rejecting, choice making, identifying, following directions, affirming etc – critical communication skills (per the Pyramid people). So you could do a letter home maybe once a month. Letter home might be a good thing to try. And you could do holiday themed crafts. You’ll have to make sure the kids with AAC have the appropriate access to vocabulary for the tasks (paper, scissors, glue, colors, more, paint, markers, stickers – anything they’d need to complete the task). You’ll be doing a LOT of hand over hand.

You might try work contracts for kids with completion difficulties or behaviors. Work contracts are AWESOME – find out what motivates a kid – they get a sticker every time they do something compliant and when they get five they get their thing – sensory break, their fav toy, their stimmy behavior.

I would get all my tools for the task and I’d put them in a clear container. I’d pull out the ones they’d need step by step, but also pull out the wrong things too. If they need to glue, pull out glue and scissors. That way they have to identify and make a choice. Hold things up near your face to encourage eye contact. Or hold two of the same thing – like a blue marker and a red marker. Or keep things in the box so they have to ask you to open, or ask for more. When they’re done ask for specific things back so they have to follow simple directions. And just follow their lead, if they need a break or something let them have it and then bring them back to the task. Make sure the kids with AAC have a way to ask for a break.

I’m always thinking in terms of critical communication skills. What do these kids need to express? How can I manipulate the situation to reach that goal? Just like in early intervention, I find it easier to squash goals into an activity rather than planning an activity around goals.

If your seventh grader, high functioning students are going to hate this, make theirs more complicated. Change the task so it suits their goals, but so that they’re still participating in the “same” task. Because while its important that they don’t think its dumb you can’t spend your whole life trying to think of “cool” things for them to do – you’ve got an hour to address their goals. Maybe they can paint rather than glue or color. Or they can write a haiku about the day’s theme. Or talk about what they like about your unit theme, they could categorize and list, compare/contrast, make a language web. Maybe there is an app or a website about your theme. Talk to the science teacher or the language arts teacher and find out the units in the classroom.

Anyway boys and girls. This is just one idea, if you have more ideas for what to do with a REALLY varied group therapy session please share! We all know that this setup is not ideal, but it IS real life.

NP: The Weepies – Twilight

Don’t be alarmed, we’re taking over the ship.

17 Sep

Whoa! Speechie off the port bow!

This post is in dedication to Talk like a Pirate Day (September 19th…of course.) The fine folks over at LessonPix asked the #slpeeps for some pirate-y themed therapy and we obliged (because we’re da bomb dot com.)

First let’s start by saying: LessonPix is AWESOME. I’m not just saying that because they asked me nicely to write this post and be part of their blogging hearties. I’m saying it because I DO WHAT I WANT, YO. What is LessonPix you ask, Dear Reader?

Well, “LessonPix is an easy-to-use online resource that allows users to create various customized learning materials.”

For serious – you can make SO MANY THINGS. It’s $36 a year, and in comparison to something similar (think in the ballpark of $400) I think it is WELL worth it. Especially since I can login on any computer – I don’t need a disk. For $36/yr I’m getting what – 11 years to the $400 one time price. (Obviously prices change and products change and therapy changes so don’t come crying to me in eleven years, that’s just a way to think of it if you’re having trouble with the cost in your brain.)

 What sorts of things can you make? I’ll tell you. Picture cards such as THESE:

Seriously. Do Not Copy. Or I will hunt you down.

Or you can create about a zillion other things. You pick the PIX you want, and the website creates PDFs with your material.

Materials Frankenstein

You can search what you need, upload personal images – it pretty much does all of the things. Which is awesome because I’ve got things to do, I can’t be hanging out in Paint all day trying to draw with my arrow mouse. I couldn’t do that in fourth grade and I can’t do it today.

Self Portrait

Anyway back to the pirates. I’m working for the MOST part as an Early Intervention Therapist. My caseload is composed primarily of two year olds (Yeah I didn’t know I had patience either, you aren’t the only one who is surprised.)

When LessonPix asked if I’d use their pirate materials to do therapy I was all about it. Here are some things I made:

Shapes treasure map

These are GREAT, because obviously I can put anything I need to in there. For a lot of my kiddos we’re working on receptive language – specifically identification of familiar objects/toys and following directions. So in the case of the treasure map up there, I put in images that correspond to a puzzle I was using in therapy. Then I can provide not only a verbal cue, but I can point to an image. Many of my clients require an extra prompt or two so adding a visual component is a great way to supplement cues I’m already providing. And since it’s on a treasure map, I can use these little guys to hop along to the next piece:

Me crew

If I wanted to do a themed therapy session with pirates, I could use the game board and a corresponding toy for a scavenger hunt type of activity. I found this in our therapy cabinet and it worked great for such a task:

Tis me ship

You can see that this toy has many components, such as cannon, helm, mast, spyglass, ladder, etc. While playing we could go over these vocabulary terms and then use the gameboard to prompt “giving” specific items or identifying by pointing. In early childhood therapy themes are often used so even if there was an ocean or beach unit, this type of toy could fit in nicely. And having engaging, novel materials to use with little ones is pretty much key to your survival so LessonPix really helps out with that!

I will absolutely be using LessonPix materials again, I think their product is amazing! My brain can’t even understand how the picture gets to the TV Screen so I have no idea how they’re making customizable materials out of thin air that make my life so easy.  Now all I need is a real pirate to help me cotreat…

NP: The Little Mermaid – Part of your World

Breakin’ the Law

4 Sep

Something that has been on my mind lately is following the rules.

As an undergrad when I was first introduced to testing protocol it was hammered into our heads, “DO WHAT THE MANUAL SAYS.” No extra prompting, no coloring outside the lines, just do what you are supposed to do or the test is invalidated and you suck.

And I’m okay with this, but only in the case of eligibility. You give a test to determine eligibility for services, then you want the results to be reliable and valid. So follow the rules.

However, tests have a lot of purposes. You can use a test to probe a specific area of concern, to screen, to compare to previous results. As an SLP I am certainly curious about my clients’ problem areas and I want them to qualify for skilled services. But I also want to know how they perform with prompts and cues. I want to alter protocols to explore my clients’ strengths and weaknesses. I want to make goals that truly suit their needs. And in these cases I say, go ahead and break the rules! (Do it, I dare you.)

The same goes for specific therapy techniques. There are a lot of programs out there that you must attend the workshop, obtain a certification, and follow the rules! This program won’t work unless you follow those rules! And you know what – some of these programs genuinely work, have excellent evidence backing them up, and are truly wonderful for our clients.

But by suggesting that “the rules” work for every single client is unrealistic. Our clients are individuals and between them, their needs are so different. I say take those rules and stick with the main basis and the main theory, but alter them as needed! I want my clients to experience success and I’ll change up things if I determine that it is appropriate to do so.

You’ll often hear “You aren’t doing X-program if you aren’t following the rules outlined by said program.” And to that I say, “So be it.” I don’t particularly care if I’m following the rules so long as I’m making therapy beneficial to my client. Obviously you should NOT run around saying you’re a provider of a specific kind of therapy or program if you haven’t actually been certified (that’s a quick way to get yourself sued), but if you have and you want to make some changes I think you should be able to. I understand and respect companies’ desire to charge money to certify and educate SLPs in their specific program, but I also think it is a little backwards that companies have resources and ideas that WORK that aren’t open sourced to all clinicians. We should all have equal access to important research and programs.

As CSD professionals we are lucky enough to have an incredible amount of resources at hand. Tests and tools and strategies that are becoming more and more evidence based. With the #slpeeps on Twitter we can discuss what we like and don’t like, and explore what really works. It is really wonderful. I think we should use each other’s skills, expertise, and ideas for adapting protocols even more than we do now, and really encourage the concept of open-source therapy. Share the adaptations that work, so we can all help our clients benefit!

NP: The Cure – Pictures of You

Input please

29 May

Hey there boys and girls.

I completed my thesis today. Printed it on the fancy paper. Turned it in. Paid for the binding. EEEK. I made six copies total – 3 for the school, one for me, my mom, and my thesis advisor.

Now, I’m wondering where I could submit my research? I’ll likely submit it to the state newsletter, but I’d love to try to get it into a national publication. The title of my project is:

EXPRESSIVE LANGUAGE IN RESPONSE TO PERSONAL VERSUS GENERIC PHOTOGRAPHS: A PILOT STUDY OF PERFORMANCE IN INDIVIDUALS WITH ALZHEIMER’S DISEASE AND THOSE WITHOUT

So that is that. It’s all about stimulating detailed and complex language in persons with dementia. I had a total of 8 participants. I didn’t reach statistical significance, but I was reaching statistical significance through large effect size.

Any ideas? Please share! I am all about disseminating information and I would love to tell people about this project.